I live in Charlevoix with my wife, Anne.  I have a son, Oliver, who lives in Bloomington, Indiana.  I was born in Indiana and grew up there, in a small town near Fort Wayne. Anne and I visited the Charlevoix area in our boat about six years ago and really liked the town and entire area.  We purchased a summer home north of downtown Charlevoix and one year later decided to sell our home in Indiana and move to Charlevoix to live here full time.  What attracted us to this area was the natural beauty, the charm of the communities, and the friendliness of the people; but one of the major reasons we chose to move here was the quality of the area bike trails.

The following is a requested message from Bill Prall, TOMTC's Safety and Maintenance Director: One very easy thing we bicyclists can do to promote bicycling is to STOP! On roadways or bike paths with traffic STOP signs or RED lights the Michigan Motor Vehicle Code (MVC) and the Michigan Compiled Law (MCL), states that you must obey these traffic signals. Where do Michigan laws apply to bicycles? 

April 2018   (Map here) Planners for the Charlevoix  to Traverse City Trail (CHX – TC Trail) have an ambitious goal to connect two regional trail networks that link the communities of Traverse City, Acme, Elk Rapids, Eastport, Norwood and Charlevoix with over 300 miles of existing trails from Alpena to Suttons Bay. This requires combining what trail users want with suitable land and road right-of-ways that can support a non-motorized recreation and transportation trail. The trail will pass through beautiful scenery and provide access to 24 public amenities including parks, beaches, natural areas, communities, and other destinations along the US-31 corridor. The project builds on the vision of more than a decade of community groups working to make trail connections.

April 2018   (Map here) The Boyne Valley Trailway Committee has planned a trail through the Boyne River Valley that will connect Boyne City with Boyne Falls and the Boyne Mountain Resort. In addition, it will connect five schools with a non-motorized recreation trail that will accommodate pedestrians, runners, cross country skiers, snowshoers and cyclists at all times of the year.